Tools for volleyball coaches

Labels

You can categorize the drills you post on Volleytools by adding labels to them. In this way, you indicate their purpose or goal. You can also use labels in your year plans, to indicate what you'll practice during practice sessions and to see what you already practiced.

The labels are divided into categories. The labels themselves and their categories are described below.

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Attacking

The labels in the category “attacking” are meant for drills that aim to improve the skill of attacking.

General

Use this label if the skill of attacking is used during a drill without focussing on a particular aspect of attacking.

Back in play via the block

You can use this label for drills in which the spiker is asked to deliberately play the ball into the block of the opponent with the intention to immediately recover it. This way, the attacking team gets another chance to set up an attack.

Off-speed shot

A spiker can try to catch the defensive players off guard by hitting an off-speed shot, which is a spike at half the speed of a normal spike.

Offence system

An offence system dictates when and where spikes will take place, and how this is communicated. A coding system that divides the net and the three-meter line into zones is also part of the offence system.

Out of bounds via the block

You can use this label for drills in which the spiker is asked to score by hitting the ball out of bounds via the block.

Shove

A shove is a ball that is pushed through the opponents block by a spiker.

Slide

A slide is a particular type of spike by the middle hitter, where the approach takes place in parallel with the net.

Spike

Use this label for drills that practice the basic power spike.

Tip

A tip is a ball that is played just over and behind the block by a spiker.

Wipe-off

A wipe-off is a ball that is pushed out of bounds via the block by a spiker.

Position 1

Use this label for drills that practice attacking on position 1.

Position 2

Use this label for drills that practice attacking on position 2.

Position 3

Use this label for drills that practice attacking on position 3.

Position 4

Use this label for drills that practice attacking on position 4.

Position 5

Use this label for drills that practice attacking on position 5.

Position 6

Use this label for drills that practice attacking on position 6.

Basics

The labels in the category “basics” are meant for drills that aim to improve the basic volleyball skills.

Catch-and-set

Use this label for drills that practice the catch-and-set movement.

Catch-and-throw

Use this label for drills that practice the catch-and-throw movement.

Forearm pass/bump

Use this label for drills that aim to improve the basic skills of bumping and forearm passing.

There are other labels for drills that practice passing serves or spikes.

Ground contact

Learning to land safely on the ground is a prerequisite for a number of defensive skills, like diving and rolling.

Use this label for drills that practice landing or falling safely.

Overhead pass

Use this label for drills that practice the basic skill of overhead passing.

There are other labels for overhead digging a spiked ball, overhead passing a serve, and setting.

Standing spike

Pepper-like drills require players to spike balls while standing. You can use this label for such drills to distinguish them from drills that require more game-like spikes.

Blocking

The labels in the cateogry “blocking” are meant for drills that aim to teach and improve the skill of blocking.

General

Use this label if the skill of blocking is used during a drill without focussing on a particular aspect of blocking.

Blocking formation

The blocking formation dictates the positions of the blocking players at the moment the opponent's setter is about to set.

Blocking system

You can use this label for drills that practice a blocking system, such as read-and-react or commit blocking.

Individual block

Use this label for drills that practice individual blocking.

Three-player block

Use this label for drills that practice the three-player block.

Two-player block

Use this label for drills that practice the two-player block.

Position 2

Use this label for drills that practice blocking near position 2.

Position 3

Use this label for drills that practice blocking near position 3.

Position 4

Use this label for drills that practice blocking near position 4.

Defence

The labels in the category “defence” are meant for drills that aim to teach and improve the defensive skills.

By defence, we refer to the set of skills aimed at keeping the ball of the ground and playing it towards the setter after an attack by the opponent.

General

Use this label if a drill involves defence, without focussing on one aspect in particular.

Defence formation

The defence formation dictates the position each player takes when the setter of the opposing team is about to set.

Defence system

The defence system dictates the position and defensive responsibilities of each player at the moment the opposing team spikes.

Dig

Use this label for drills that train the basic forearm dig.

Dive

Balls that will land further away from a player than expected can sometimes still be defended by diving towards the ball. You use your legs to initiate the dive and jump towards the ball.

Overhead dig

Use this label for drills that train the overhead dig.

Roll

The roll itself is not really a defensive skill, but rather a way to break your fall after defending and losing your balance. One of the positive aspects of the roll is the fact that it allows you to quickly get back on your feet again.

Running dive

If a ball cannot be reached using a normal dive, players can run towards a ball and dive at the end to try to still defend it.

Spiker coverage

One of the first defensive responsibilities is preventing the opponent's block to directly score a point by blocking a spike by your team. By covering your spikers, you ensure that you're ready to defend against balls that are deflected by the opponent's block.

Sprawl

You use the sprawl if you cannot keep your balance after defending a ball. You use your arms and chest to break your fall after the defence.

Serve reception

The labels in the category “serve reception” are meant for drills that aim to teach and improve the skill of serve reception.

By serve reception, we refer to the skill of keeping the ball of the ground and playing it towards the setter after a service by the opponent.

General

Use this label if the skill of serve reception is used during a drill without focussing on a particular aspect.

Forearm pass

You can use this label for drills that practice forearm passing of the serve.

Overhead pass

You can use this label for drills that practice overhead passing the serve.

Passing formation

The passing formation dictates the positions of your players at the moment the opponent serves.

Serving

The labels in the category “serving” are meant for drills that aim to teach and improve the skill of serving.

General

Use this label if the skill of serving is used during a drill without focussing on a particular aspect of serving.

Concealed float serve

A concealed float serve is a serve that is meant to surprise the opponent. The server initiates the toss and approach of a jump serve, but switches to a jump float in mid air.

Float serve

The purpose of a float serve is to make the ball float in the air and move unpredictably, by hitting it in such a way that it doesn't spin.

Jump float

The jump float is a variant of the float serve, where the ball is hit after the player has jumped in the air.

Jump serve

The jump serve is a variant of the standing overhand serve. Instead of hitting the ball from a standing position, the player hits the ball after an approach followed by a jump.

Overhand serve

Together with the underhand serve, the standing overhand serve is one of the serves most used by beginners. The ball is served with top spin from a standing position.

Underhand serve

The underhand serve is the most basic serve in volleyball. The ball is held in one hand in front of the hips and hit from this position with the other.

Setting

The labels in the category “setting” are meant for drills that aim to teach and improve the skill of setting.

General

Use this label if the skill of setting is used during a drill without focussing on a particular aspect of setting.

Back-court setting

Use this label for drills that practice setting from the back of the court.

Back-court takeover

If the setter defends the ball, another player has to take over the set. Use this label for drills that train the situation where a back-row player takes over the set.

Backward

This label can be used for drills that focus on backward setting.

Bump setting

If the setter is unable to give a set using the overhead technique, it might be required to bump set the ball. Use this label for drills that practice bump setting.

Dump

The setter can score a direct point by dumping the ball instead of playing it to one of the attackers.

Front-court takeover

If the setter defends the ball, another player has to take over the set. Use this label for drills that train the situation where a front-row player takes over the set.

Jump setting

By minimizing the distance between the point of contact of the setter and the point of contact of the hitter, the game can be sped up. Jump setting is one way of minimizing this distance.

One-handed set

In some cases, it might be impossible for the setter to set the ball with both hands. In such cases, the setter might still be able to perform a one-handed set.

Overhead

This label can be used for drills that focus on the overhead setting technique.

Penetration

If the setter is a back-row player, he or she needs to penetrate towards the net after the opponent has served.

Sideways

Sometimes, the ball is played so close to the net that the setter is unable to set it with the usual technique. In that case, setting the ball sideways might be a way to still properly set the ball.

Mental skills

The labels in the category “metal skills” are meant for drills aimed at teaching and improving metal skills.

General

This label can be used to indicate that mental skills are part of an exercise or drill, without focussing on one of the aspects that are explicitly mentioned here.

Confidence

A confident player is convinced that he or she can be successful in the future. Confidence has a big impact on performance. You can use this label for exercises and drills that improve confidence, for instance by applying positive self-talk.

Emotional control

Emotional control entails managing your emotions to prevent them from having an undesired effect on your performance.

Focussing

Optimal concentration is the result of using the right attentional focus at the right moment to focus on the relevant aspects of the task you're performing.

Individual goals

The motivation, commitment, focus, confidence, and perseverance of players can be improved by setting individual goals. Additionally, setting individual goals makes it possible to evaluate the behavior of players.

Regulating tension

Tension regulation is used to optimize the level of tension. You can use this label for exercises and drills that train increasing or decreasing the level of tension in your body.

Team building

Team building refers to activities, exercises, and drills that can be used to transform a group of people into a team that functions optimally. Setting team goals and defining a team culture are examples of team-building activities.

Visualization

Visualization is carefully playing back a certain situation in the mind, using all senses.

Drill type

The labels in the category “drill type” can be used to indicate how a drill is planned to take place.

Individal

Use this label for drills where players practice individually.

Cooperating group without net

Use this label for drills where players practice in cooperating groups, without the use of a net. In this type of drill, players cooperate to keep the ball in play. There are no winners or losers within a group.

Cooperating group with net

Use this label for drills where players practice in cooperating groups, where one part of the group is separated from the other by a net. In this type of drill, players cooperate to keep the ball in play. There are no winners or losers within a group.

Game phase in isolation

Use this label for drills for practicing a single phase of the game. In this type of drill, rallies don't continue until their natural end, but are stopped at a designated point instead. This label applies to butterfly drills or drills like pass-set-hit, for example.

Small team against small team

Use this label for small games in which teams of one to four players compete, separated by a net.

Big team against small team

Use this label for small games where one team of four to six players competes against a team of one to four players, separated by a net.

Big team against big team

Use this label for small games in which two teams of four to six players compete, separated by a net.

Section

The labels in the category “section” are meant to indicate in which part of a training session a drill fits.

Warming-up

During the warming-up at the start of a training session, players perform drills that prepare them for the more demanding drills that will follow.

Core I

During Core I of a training session, you focus on specific aspects of a skill in small groups.

Core II

During Core II of a training session, you practice the aspects that were the topic of Core I in a more game-like setting, usually in larger groups.

Conclusion

During the conclusion of a training session, the skills that were practiced as part of the training session are combined and executed during a game-like drill.